[Item #80553] Natural History of Central Asia, Volume One [all published]. The New Conquest of Central Asia: A Narrative of the Explorations of the Central Asiatic Expeditions in Mongolia and China, 1921-1930 [Presentation Copy, Inscribed to Howard Chandler Christy]. CHINA, Roy Chapman ANDREWS, Clifford H. Pope Walter Granger, Nels C. Nelson.

Natural History of Central Asia, Volume One [all published]. The New Conquest of Central Asia: A Narrative of the Explorations of the Central Asiatic Expeditions in Mongolia and China, 1921-1930 [Presentation Copy, Inscribed to Howard Chandler Christy]

New York: American Museum of Natural History, 1932. First Edition. First printing. Inscribed on front endpaper: "To Howard Chandler Christy / with the affectionate regards of his friend," signed, datemarked New York, June 13, 1934. Quarto (27.5cm). Original orange cloth, titled in black on spine and front cover; i-l,[1]-678pp; color frontispiece; 128 unnumbered leaves of photographic plates (halftones), some folding; three folding route maps. A sturdy copy, with subtle restoration at crown of spine and rear hinge (internal). Conspicuously darkened on spine, with light soiling to boards; internally complete, fresh and clean - Very Good overall. Later ownership signature in ink (Stephen Smith) dated 1982. An early owner (likely Christy himself) has laid down newspaper clippings on both front endpapers and on recto of first flyleaf, all relating to Christy's well-known portrait of the author (see note below).

A signal association copy of a highly desirable book, documenting the work of the American Museum of Natural History's Central Asian Expeditions, under Andrews' leadership, from 1921 to 1930. Howard Chandler Christy, the well-known illustrator and portraitist, was a close friend of Andrews and also a close neighbor on the Upper West Side of Manhattan; his portrait of the famed adventurer was reputedly the first formal portrait of a living explorer to be hung in the American Museum of Natural History (this information extracted from one of the attached clippings, from the New York World-Telgram for June 24, 1934).

Andrews' expeditions to Mongolia and China, fraught with peril, resulted in a number of significant contributions to the natural sciences, especially paleontology: "Andrews is best remembered for the series of dramatic expeditions he led to the Gobi of Mongolia from 1922 to 1930, taking teams of scientists into previously unexplored parts of the desert...his expeditions...were significant for their discovery of the first nests of dinosaur eggs, new species of dinosaurs, and the fossils of early mammals..." (Howgego, III:34). Andrews' good looks and swashbuckling style made him a household name during this period, and his fame was long-lasting enough that, much later, he would serve as the model for one of the most famous scholar-adventurers in American popular culture – Steven Spielberg's "Indiana Jones," who, according to Howgego, "in most ways he closely resembled."

Price: $2,500.00

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