[Item #60689] Through Four American Wars: The Impressions and Experiences of William H. Bisbee as told to His Grandson, William Haymond Bisbee [Warmly Inscribed, with ALS & Prospectus]. William Haymond BISBEE.

Through Four American Wars: The Impressions and Experiences of William H. Bisbee as told to His Grandson, William Haymond Bisbee [Warmly Inscribed, with ALS & Prospectus]

Boston: Meador Publishing Co, (1931). First Edition. Inscribed on front endpaper: "Dear Friend and Companion: May your kindly Christian life be reflected in many blessings / With all good wishes, Sincerely / William H. Bisbee / Brig. Gen'l," dated October 17th, 1931. Further inscribed, at his portrait facing p.274, by the author, who was General Bisbee's grandson: "To my good friend, [illegible], Bill Bisbee." First printing. Octavo; blue cloth hardcover, titled in gilt on spine and front cover; 281pp; frontispiece portrait and fifteen inserted leaves of photographic plates (halftones). Laid in is the original 4-pp publisher's prospectus and a 1-pp ALS to an A.A. Chittenden, dated March 17th, 1932, on both sides of a single sheet of Loyal Legion stationery (ca 200 words). Spine gilt a bit dull, else a tight, clean, Very Good or better copy. The laid-in prospectus is poorly trimmed at bottom, costing a few characters but no loss of sense, with old folds and brief splits; Good. The ALS is folded at center, with edge-toning and wrinkling, some mild smudges to ink and a few passages appear to have been traced over in pencil; still complete and Very Good.

Bisbee (1840-1942) was a veteran of the Civil War, the Indian Wars, the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Insurrection; enlisting as a private in 1862, he retired in 1904 as a Brigadier General, after more than 41 years of active duty. He was stationed at Fort Phil Kearney in 1866, and in this work he gives a detailed account of the Kearny Massacre, siding with Fetterman and disparaging the military competence of commanding officer Col. F.G. Carrington.

In the enclosed letter, to a fellow member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, Bisbee opens with "My dear friend and companion," and goes on to express regret over his absence at recent Loyal Legion meetings, which he suggests has been the result of a falling out between himself and the Board of the Massachusetts Commandery, which he accuses of suppressing his comments in response to a call for suggestions "touching the welfare of the Legion." Though written by a man of ninety-two, the letter in Bisbee's hand remains strong and legible. When Bisbee died, in 1942, he was the oldest retired U.S. Army General still living. A great copy of a rather uncommon book. GRAFF 305.

Price: $750.00

Go Back