[Item #58456] Negro Masonry, Being a Critical Examination of Objections to the Legitimacy of the Masonry Existing Among the Negroes of America. AFRICAN AMERICANA, William H. UPTON, FRATERNAL ORGANIZATIONS.

Negro Masonry, Being a Critical Examination of Objections to the Legitimacy of the Masonry Existing Among the Negroes of America

Cambridge, MA: The M.W. Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, 1902. First Edition Thus. Octavo (23.5cm); navy blue cloth, with titles stamped in gilt on spine; xii,264pp, with two photographic plates featuring portraits of the author, and John J. Smith (the only surviving member of African Lodge, No.459). Ink signature of Adelaide M. Cromwell to front endpaper. Light wear to extremities, spine ends nudged and a bit worn, with some faint, scattered stains and spots of soil to covers, and a short tear to lower front endpaper; contents fresh; Very Good+.

Extensively expanded edition of Upton's 1899 pamphlet Light on a Dark Subject. Upton, a white man who was then Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Washington State Mainstream Masonry, was among the first to recognize Prince Hall Masonry, and his supreme wish was for African Americans to be admitted into the Masonic brotherhood. "When he died his will stated that there was not to be any marker on his grave until such time as Black Masonry and White Masonry had joined in mutual recognition in Washington state. It took almost a hundred years but in 1990 the two Grand Lodges were joined in mutual recognition. And on June 8, 1991, both Grand Lodges gathered to now lay a marker on William Upton's grave" (Milliken, Frederic L. "William H. Upton." The Phoenixmasonry Masonic Museum and Library).

Adelaide Cromwell Hill (née Mcguinn Cromwell, 1919-2019) was an African-American sociologist and professor emeritus at Boston University, where she co-founded the African Studies Center in 1959 and directed the graduate program in Afro-American studies from 1969 to 1985. WORK, p.415.

Price: $450.00

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