[Item #56825] Collection of Seven Printed Broadsides from The Peace Garden, ca 1966-69. ANARCHISM, Peter Mason BOND, aka "Pemabo", PACIFISM.

Collection of Seven Printed Broadsides from The Peace Garden, ca 1966-69

[San Francisco: Peter Mason Bond, ca 1966-69]. Seven broadsides (two double-sided), offset-printed in colors on thick, varicolored stock. Dimensions 28cm x 22cm [11" x 8-1/2"] but for two smaller examples, 28cm x 11cm (8-1/2" x 5-1/2"). A few small marginal nicks, occasional light soil, but a uniformly Near Fine assemblage. Includes:

1) Billy-Goat-Graham Says I Want You! You Sucker...
2) My Last Warning! to the United Nations Organization! All Governments Must Unite...
3) The Haight-Ashbury Psychology is all over the world...
4) Onward Christian Soldiers / Onward Peaceful Soldiers
5) To the United Nation's [sic] Organization for Peace - Stop! Look & Listen...
6) [Recto] Pemabo of the "Peace Garden" Challenges!! [Verso] 1,000 Superstitions Called "Religions"...
7) [Recto] Out of the Depths of a starlit night... [Verso] My Book "The Trio of Disaster" will Teach You...

A colorful and representative sample of the work of Peter Mason Bond (1880-1971), eccentric anarchist folk-artist, peace activist and leafleteer of San Francisco, known to the public by his self-chosen pseudonym, "Pemabo." Pemabo's Peace Garden, which occupied the lot adjacent to his home at 1039 Clayton Street in Haight-Ashbury, was a mad clutter of hand-painted signs and sculptures whose boldly-lettered messages expostulated his radical pacifist, anti-religious, and anti-statist philosophies ("God is not in any church or government!"; "Seminaries breed impractical men"; "God's law must replace Astrology, Judaism and Christianity;" "President Johnson is an Insane Christian Paradox"). Though Pemabo, who had emigrated to San Francisco from Australia in 1905, was well advanced in years by the time the San Francisco counterculture began to pick up steam in the early 1960s, his Peace Garden became a mecca for beatniks, freaks and dropouts of all types. In a 1969 Rolling Stone Magazine profile, he is quoted saying, "...a lot of [hippies] come here...I try to do what I can for them. I quote what Shakespeare said about how wonderfully made is the human body; you must preserve and not destroy it, and this is especially important now, with LSD, marijuana, and other drugs. They are a blister, a pimple on Father Time..." The Peace Garden was dismantled after Bond's death in 1971, and most of the signs and artwork were destroyed.

The circumstances surrounding the production and distribution of these flyers and broadsides have never, to our knowledge, been documented. We imagine they were handed out, or sold for a nominal fee, to visitors to the Peace Garden or at countercultural events around the Bay Area. Print runs were likely small and distribution was likely hand-to-hand. Whatever the circumstances, they have proved highly ephemeral. Very few copies appear to have survived. We find only three examples catalogued in institutional collectons (of these, only one, "The Haight Ashbury Psychology..." is present in the current collection). Individual flyers have surfaced occasionally in commerce, but a representative gathering of this size appears unprecedented. Together, they present a compelling picture of bohemian Haight-Ashbury at the cusp of the hippie movement and provide some of the only surviving documentation of one of the city's most colorful figures.

Price: $1,750.00

Go Back