Voices From the South: Black Students Talk About Their Experiences in Desegregated Schools. Betsy FANCHER.

Voices From the South: Black Students Talk About Their Experiences in Desegregated Schools

Washington DC: Souther Regional Council, 1970. First Edition. First Printing. Quarto (28cm); gray stapled wrappers, titled in brown with die-cut window title display in black; 46pp.;minor corner bend upper front cover; one library stamp to cover; notation to upper corner reads: "Negroes, Education"' about Near Fine.

"The Southern Regional Council interviewed students in four widely diverse Southern communities, in July of 1970, about their experiences in desegregated schools. The survey objective was to find answers to such urgent questions posed by integration as: whether the students were just a bitter vocal minority, or whether they represented a new wave of militancy born of the disillusionment of black students with the great experiment of integration. Students' opinions quoted at great length related to the situations in Mobile (Alabama), Charlotte (North Carolina), and Greenville and Beaufort (South Carolina), and ranged from bitter negativism of attitude to that of cautious optimism. Findings reported are contended to indicate: that there did not seem to be a mass embracing of separatism, but that many were being edged in that direction by factors such as humiliating experiences in desegregated classrooms; that the unkept rich promises of integration were making students lose all faith in the American system..." (TROVE).

Price: $40.00

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