Rationale for Restitution. Two addresses delivered during the Sunday morning service on June 8, 1969 at [St. George's Church, Stuyvesant Square, New York]. James FORMAN, Edward O. Miller.

Rationale for Restitution. Two addresses delivered during the Sunday morning service on June 8, 1969 at [St. George's Church, Stuyvesant Square, New York]

New York: St. George's Church, 1969. First Edition. Octavo. Staple-bound pamphlet; pictorial thick paper wrappers; [28]pp; illus. Clean, tight, and unmarked; Near Fine. Photographic text illustrations throughout (halftones). Includes introductory remarks by Rev. E.O. Miller; address by James Forman; and transcript of Question & Answer session.

Transcript of remarks by James Forman, Chairman of the United Black Appeal, and Edward O. Miller, Rector of St. George's Church, on the topic of financial reparations to the African American community as restituition for the institution of slavery. Forman directly accuses the major religious denominations both of historical complicity in slavery and in current suppression of the movement for restitutions, noting that "...the people who sold black mothers on the selling block were Christians...people who would kill over 9,000 known black people since Reconstruction, and would pray on Sunday, were Christians...;" while the "church today is fundamentally a financial institution" with investment interests in companies involved "in exploitation of colored peoples around the world...and poor people, too." During the Q&A session following his talk, Forman specifies a five hundred million dollar cash reparation, and outlines how his National Black Economic Development Conference would allocate the funds.

Some weeks earlier, Forman had interrupted services at Riverside Church in Manhattan to deliver similar remarks (which would become popularly known as "The Black Manifesto"), drawing the ire of New York City Mayor John Lindsay, who established a special unit in the NYPD to suppress further direct action by Forman and his advocacy group, the National Black Economic Development Conference. The current address, made by invitation before one of New York's wealthiest congregations, marked an important milestone in the still-evolving dialogue around restitution and financial reparations for American slavery. Uncommon; OCLC notes 4 physical locations.

Price: $200.00

Go Back