De Sodomia: Tractatus in quo exponitur doctrina nova de Sodomia Fœminarum a Tribadismo distincta

Parisiis: Apud Isidorum Liseux, 1879. First Thus. Scarce extract from Sinistrari's larger work "De Delictis et Poenis" (1654), text entirely in Latin save for the publisher's tongue-in-cheek introduction in French. Liseux gained some notoriety a few years earlier when he published "De Daemonialitate, et Incubus, et Succubis," claiming to have discovered this heretofore unknown manuscript written in 1680 by the Franciscan priest Ludovico Maria Sinistrari (1622-1701). The work described the qualities of such beasts as vampires, succubi, and incubi, though it has since been proposed that Liseux himself wrote the piece (see J. Gordon Melton, "The Vampire Book" (2010), p. 380). "De Daemonialitate" was eventually translated into English in 1879 and found its way into the hands of W.B. Yeats (who borrowed Ezra Pound's copy), and from it was inspired to compose the poem "The Black Centaur," first published in "The Tower" in 1928 (Catherine E. Paul and Warwick Gould, "W.B. Yeats and the Problem of Belief," "Yeats Annual" no. 21, p. 313).

The present work is indeed authored by Sinistrari, and remains here in its unalter ed Latin form, presumably to avoid censure, Liseux noting in his introduction that there's a reason he decided to publish this work sans illustration. Though the publisher's advertisement on the final leaf of text and rear cover only mention "De Daemonialitate," Liseux's catalog would go on to include the Kama Sutra and Ernest Dowson's "White Stains: Containing Also the Contemporary (and Most Exhaustive) Love's Cyclopaedia with Five Illustrations by Aubrey Beardsley in His Most Erotic Vein." 12mo (15cm.); publisher's cream pictorial wrappers printed in red and black; xii,89pp. Some light shelf wear and a few small soil spots, tiny chips at spine ends, else Very Good or better.

Price: $850.00

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